Trial 3 DIY Aerial Costumes: Tie Dye

I’ve figured out that I am a lot better at tie dye than painting. Especially if you have the right tie dye products.

In the past few years I knew I wanted to create more costumes either by painting/embellishing/dyeing,Β  I bought some white cotton leotards, biketards, and dance shorts from Aliexpress. They were made in China and took over 40 days to be made and arrive. I bought 5 of each and the price added up but they were all under $12-14 each.

NOTE: That when buying from China sizes run VERY small and the arm straps are NOT made for aerialists. Be prepared to make alterations.

I was at CVS and saw a tie-dye kit on sale for about $5. The colors were bright and it had everything included: dye, bottles, rubber bands, instructions and gloves. Tulip One-Step Tie Dye Kits
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I have a new little nephew who lives half a country away. I wanted to make him something personalized from me. I went to Target and bought a 5-pack of white onesies to include in my tie-dye session.

I ended up tie-dyeing 9 items at once. This made things so much easier. It took about 1.5-2 hours to do the actual tie-dyeing. Then I left them to set overnight and rinsed and washed them the next morning (this took about an hour to do).

  • x4 baby onesies
  • x1 large leotard
  • x1 biketard
  • x1 leotard and x1 dance shorts (matching)
  • x1 old tank top (as a tester)
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I did a Pinterest search on different ways to tie-dye. I used a few different methods.

Wet or Dry Method:

I tried both the wet and dry method. Having the fabric wet/damp (I ran them through a quick wash/spin in the washing machine) made applying the dye a lot easier and less messy. The wet fabric soaked up the dye easier and had a more saturated look. The dry fabric the dye would bead up and went everywhere. I had to be slower and wait for the dye to soak into the fabric. The final results with the dry fabric had a lot more white area. The first baby onesie was done dry and the last one was done wet.

This link show several different tie-dye methods.

Spiral Method:

This one is my favorite. I grabbed the fabric in the center and spun it around in a circle and put rubber bands around the entire thing. It makes 6 triangle/pie pieces that you soak with dye. (I later learned that you can use a fork to spin the fabric around…like spaghetti. This might make this easier. I’ll try it next time.) I did the first and last baby onesies with the spiral method.

Heart Method:

I wasn’t as successful at this one. BOO! This was harder than I thought. I also used a permanent marker to draw a heart on the fabric. Next time I probably won’t use permanent marker…Now I on the leotard that has the heart on it I’m going to need to either paint or do something else with it because I don’t really like the random heart… The second baby onesie was done with the heart method. It worked out a bit better than the leotard.

Bulls Eye Method:

This is a tried and true method. It leaves a big circle bulls eye on the fabric.

Stripes Method:

There are so many options on this one. You can use one or many different colors. I love it! I did the third baby onesie with this method.

Wrap up

I think tie-dye is a great inexpensive idea for aerial costumes. Especially for a less formal event.

I’m visualizing an aerial/circus tribe at a festival with everyone having different but cohesive tie-dye costumes. Either in same colors but different methods or different colors but same methods, etc.

Or for a studio Open House or Student Recital that the performers want matching custom costumes but don’t want to spend $$$ on a custom costume.

Or for an aerialist who just wants to jazz up their practice leos… (which is what I’m probably going to use these for)
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